Monday, March 23, 2020

Trans Western Chemicals Signs Distribution Agreement with Prom USA

Specialty chemical distributor Trans Western Chemicals has signed an exclusive distribution agreement with Prom USA for the Western United States.

Trans Western Chemicals stated that the partnership will strengthen its supply position in key developing markets and increase the value it can offer its long-standing customer base. Prom USA added that it is pleased to be working with a distributor as reputable and experienced as Trans Western Chemicals who help expanded sales coverage to support biocide actives.

The post Trans Western Chemicals Signs Distribution Agreement with Prom USA appeared first on American Coatings Association.



from American Coatings Association https://www.paint.org/trans-western-chemicals-signs-distribution-agreement-with-prom-usa/
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Sinochem Constructs First Overseas Polymer Additives Plant in Thailand

Sinochem International Corporation has begun construction of its first overseas polymer additives plant in Rojana Industrial Park in Thailand. The company stated that the plant opening will further consolidate Sinochem’s global leading position in the polymer additive industry.

The new plant covers an area of about 64,000 square meters, with a reported total investment of about 290 million RMB, and it is expected to be put into operation later this year. Upon completion, Sincohem stated it will have an annual production capacity of 25,000 tons of rubber antioxidant, which will fill the gap in the production of rubber antioxidant in Southeast Asian countries and provide local supplies to the company’s downstream clients in the region.

“The construction of Sinochem’s Thailand base is a milestone in the company’s expansion into the international fine chemical industry,” said Su Fu, deputy general manager of the company and CEO of Sennics. “It will help to improve the stability of the Company’s global supplies, and at the same time, create more job opportunities to support the local economy.”

According to the company, Sinochem aims to build the Thailand plant into a new generation smart factory that serves as a model facility in South-East Asia. With the company’s experience in green production and green technology, the new plant will be eco-friendly, energy-saving and sustainable, Sinochem said. It will also fulfill high standards of product quality, resource utilization, emissions of wastes, and process safety, the company added.

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from American Coatings Association https://www.paint.org/sinochem-constructs-first-overseas-polymer-additives-plant-in-thailand/
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EPA Releases Final Chemical Data Reporting Rule

Last week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) made available the pre-publication version of its Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) Rule  under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The CDR requires companies that manufacture, produce or import a chemical in amounts of 25,000 pounds or greater to report volumes and other information to EPA. Chemicals subject to a specified type of EPA rule or order have a lower threshold of 2,500 pounds or more.

While issuing its final rule, EPA issued a companion notification to extend the 2020 reporting period by two months; the reporting period runs from June 1, 2020 through November 30, 2020.

The CDR rule is required by TSCA section 8(a) of the TSCA and was formerly known as the Inventory Update Rule (IUR). Under the CDR rule, EPA collects this information every four years.

EPA will host a webinar on March 31, 2020 to review CDR requirements. EPA has not yet published log-in or registration information for the webinar. For information, e-mail: ecdrweb@epa.gov.

In the final rule, EPA adopted the following amendments.

  • EPA updated requirements for confidentiality claims, including when up-front substantiation is required, updated substantiation questions and data elements excluded from confidentiality.
  • EPA replaced processing and use codes with codes based on the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) functional use, product and article use codes. EPA is also requiring OECD codes for consumer and commercial use information.

    Reporting using the OECD codes will be required for all chemical substances during the 2024 submission period. For the 2020 reporting period, OECD codes are required for reporting any chemicals designated as high priority for risk evaluation in 2019. Otherwise, use of the OECD codes is voluntary during the 2020 reporting period.

  • EPA is adding a requirement to identify the site of manufacture with an NAICS code.
  • EPA modified the requirement for when a chemical is removed from a waste stream to report recycling, remanufacture, reprocessing or reuse.
  • EPA added a voluntary data element when reporting byproducts to report percent total production volume as a range.
  • EPA is requiring secondary submitters in a joint submission report function of the chemical and percentage in imported product.
  • EPA added new naming conventions for reporting and identification of parent companies.
  • EPA revised its process for reporting by co-manufactures to submit information directly to EPA in its e-CDR system.
  • EPA finalized two exemptions related to by-products. The first exempts by-products recycled in a site-limited, closed system. The second is for by-products manufactured as part of a non-integral pollution control and boiler equipment.

Additionally, EPA made several editorial changes to text to enhance clarity.

More information is available from EPA’s CDR Rule website.

Contact ACA’s Riaz Zaman for more information.

The post EPA Releases Final Chemical Data Reporting Rule appeared first on American Coatings Association.



from American Coatings Association https://www.paint.org/cdr-final/
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Chemours Inaugurates Innovation Center

The Chemours Company has inaugurated its innovation center, The Chemours Discovery Hub, on the University of Delaware’s Science, Technology and Advanced Research (STAR) Campus. The 312,000-square-foot facility houses more than 300 of the company’s top researchers and scientists, consolidating most of the company’s U.S. innovation efforts into one location to maximize collaboration and efficiency, the company reported.

According to Chemours, the Discovery Hub will be used to deepen its research partnership with the University of Delaware and perform experiments alongside professors and students to develop new applications for its products. Additionally, the company stated that it will use its facility to attract and recruit potential interns, co-ops, and employees.

“This is about so much more than a new R&D facility; it’s about our company’s investment in young minds who will be introduced to chemistry at the Discovery Hub, our continued investment in Delaware, and our investment in an innovation pipeline that will empower our customers and change the world for the better,” said Mark Vergnano, president and chief executive officer of Chemours. “The Chemours Discovery Hub is a living symbol of the company we are becoming – open, collaborative, imaginative, and focused on the future. We are thrilled to see what innovations our team will dream up in this building, all within the creative environment of a public university.”

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from American Coatings Association https://www.paint.org/chemours-inaugurates-innovation-center/
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CFATS Reauthorization Bill Moves Forward in Congress

On March 14, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 6160, which would extend the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) program for 18 months. Authorization for the CFATS program expires on April 18, 2020. The CFATS program focuses on preventing chemicals of interest from being stolen, diverted, sabotaged or deliberately released by terrorists or other bad actors.

The Senate is expected to take up the bill soon as the clock winds down on the critical CFATS program.

The legislation was introduced on March 9 by Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), chair of the Committee on Homeland Security; Frank Pallone (D-N.J.), chair of the Energy and Commerce Committee; Paul Tonko (D-N.Y.), chair of the Environment and Climate Change Subcommittee; and Cedric Richmond (D-La.), chair of the Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection and Innovation Committee.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) implements the CFATS program under a variety of short-term authorizations by Congress. On Jan. 18, 2019, President Trump signed into law H.R. 251, the Chemical Facilities Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) Program Extension Act. This law reauthorized for 15 months the CFATS program, which was set to lapse on Jan. 19, 2019.

Under CFATS, chemical facilities possessing more than a threshold amount of specific explosive, toxic, or other “chemicals of interest” determined by DHS, are required to complete a “top-screen,” notifying DHS that they possess such chemicals on site. Once a facility submits its top-screen, DHS can direct the facility to submit a Security Vulnerability Assessment (SVA). The SVA provides the basis for DHS to assign the facility to one of four tiers: Tiers 1 and 2 being the highest risk, and Tiers 3 and 4 being the lowest. Tier assignment triggers a requirement to submit a Site Security Plan (SSP) or an Alternative Security Plan (ASP) to DHS for authorization and approval.

ACA has long been a proponent of long-term authorization for CFATS, a critical program aimed at preventing chemicals from being stolen, diverted, sabotaged, or deliberately released by terrorists or other bad actors. ACA has repeatedly urged Congress to act swiftly to provide for a multi-year authorization of the program, which covers approximately 3,400 chemical facilities assessed to present a risk of terrorist attack or exploitation.

ACA considers CFATS a necessary regulatory scheme to help industry and communities be safer and more secure. ACA is eager to work with Congress and DHS as it considers improvements to the program, which would give industry regulatory certainty and stability to make prudent risk management decisions and investments.

While supporting the CFATS program, ACA has sought updates to the program to implement and improve chemical security. ACA submitted recommendations to Congress for CFATS enhancements compiled from ACA’s member companies, who own and operate paint, coatings, resin, or chemical manufacturing facilities. Some of these facilities are subject to CFATS, with the majority classified as Tier 4 facilities, while just a few are Tier 3.

Specifically, ACA has sought the following:

  • Greater transparency for CFATS tiering determinations and security plan review;
  • Focus on risk-based determinations for personnel surety requirements;
  • Regular review of the “chemicals of interest” list; and
  • Improved coordination for CFATS with other federal chemical security and safety regulatory programs.

ACA supports the safe handling and use of chemicals, and the structure which CFATS provides to enable that in practice. ACA is also a longstanding member of the Chemical Sector Coordinating Council (CSCC). Organized by DHS, the CSCC expands communication between industry and DHS. Through the CSCC, ACA has advised DHS on how it might develop more effective solutions to implement and improve chemical security.

Contact ACA’s Rhett Cash for more information.

The post CFATS Reauthorization Bill Moves Forward in Congress appeared first on American Coatings Association.



from American Coatings Association https://www.paint.org/cfats-2020/
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Washington Governor Signs Delay of Copper Ban

On March 18, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D), signed into law legislation delaying the state ban on the use of copper in antifouling paints until 2026. The measure, Substitute Senate Bill 6210, also directs the state Department of Ecology (DOE) to take further investigative action by completing another study and convening a stakeholder advisory group to review the state of science to fully understand potential alternatives, and examine all environmental impacts from the use of antifouling paints in Washington waters.

SSB 6210 passed in the Washington Senate in February 2020 and in the Washington House of Representatives in early March.

ACA and its members — who manufacture marine coatings, and active ingredient suppliers who sell marine coatings products in the State of Washington — actively supported this course of action.

Throughout the Washington 2019–2020 legislative session, ACA worked closely with DOE, environmental non-profit organizations, and other industry stakeholders to develop a solution on how the state should move forward with potentially restricting the use of copper and other biocides in antifouling paints. Ultimately, all interested parties agreed that further study of the environmental impacts from the use of antifouling paints in the State of Washington was required, and as set out in SSB 6210.

Specifically, the law mandates a DOE-directed scientific study, convening a stakeholder advisory group to review the state of science, fully understand potential alternatives, and examine all environmental impacts from the use of antifouling paints in Washington waters.

ACA looks forward to working with DOE and other interested stakeholders on the development of this new report that will include all available science, environmental modeling, and performance data so that the legislature can eventually make an informed decision that is in the best interests of its constituents.

Background

In 2011, the Washington State Legislature passed RCW 70.300.020 – Restrictions on Sale and Application of Antifouling Paint Containing Copper, to phase out the use of copper-based antifouling paints on recreational boats. A recreational vessel is defined in the law as being no more than 65 feet in length and used primarily for pleasure. The 2011 bill also directed the Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE) to study antifouling paints and report back to the Legislature about its findings in 2017. The first stage of the copper restriction was scheduled to take effect on January 1, 2018.

DOE’s report to the Legislature was completed in 2017 and found that there is not a proven, superior biocide alternative to copper. Thus, DOE recommended that the Legislature delay the ban on copper-based antifouling paints so it could conduct additional research. In response to Ecology’s 2017 report and recommendations, the Legislature passed Substitute House Bill (SHB) 2634 in 2018, which delayed the ban on copper-based antifouling paints until 2021. SHB 2634 provided DOE with ample time to conduct further research and analysis of antifouling paints and their ingredients, including the relative impacts of copper versus non-copper biocides using models based on Washington State data: Puget Sound marina designs and water quality conditions. SHB 2634 also directed Ecology to report back to the Legislature about their review and recommendations for regulatory changes, if any, in 2019.

Pursuant to the Legislature’s directive in SHB 2634, DOE submitted its report and recommendations in December 2019. The department recommended that the Legislature amend RCW 70.300.020 in the following ways during the 2020 legislative session:

  • Delay the existing statutory ban on copper-based antifouling paints until 2026 to allow for more scientific research and information to be developed;
  • Ban the sale and application of antifouling paints containing Cybutryne/Irgarol for recreational vessels in Washington; and
  • Grant Ecology authority to request information from paint manufacturers regarding ingredients, leach rates, and other relevant data.

Substitute and Final Bill

There were many developments during the 2020 legislative session. Based on its recommendations from the 2019 report, DOE submitted two identical bills for consideration by the Washington State Legislature (Senate Bill 6210 and House Bill 2385). As the legislative session progressed, ACA urged lawmakers to amend the bills by adding a requirement that DOE take further investigative action by completing another study and convening a stakeholder advisory committee to review the state of science, fully understand potential alternatives, and examine environmental tradeoffs and any potential unintended impacts of a ban on the use of copper in antifouling paints for recreational vessels.

After much discussion between ACA, industry coalition partners, DOE and environmental group, all parties agreed that the following be included in a substitute bill (SSB 6210):

  • Direct DOE to conduct a review with stakeholder engagement and submit a report to the Legislature by June 30, 2024, on information about antifouling paints and ingredients; the feasibility of best management practices and nonbiocidal antifouling alternatives; and any additional relevant scientific or technical information;
  • Make the 2026 ban on copper-based antifouling paints contingent on a determination by Ecology that safer and effective alternatives to copper-based antifouling paints are feasible, reasonable, and readily available;
  • Require Ecology to conduct a second review and report by June 30, 2029, of relevant studies and information on alternatives to copper-based antifouling paints, if Ecology does not determine by June 30, 2024 that safer and effective alternatives to copper-based antifouling paints are feasible, reasonable, and readily available;
  • Ban the sale and application of antifouling paints containing Cybutryne/Irgarol for recreational vessels in Washington; and
  • Grant Ecology authority to request information from paint manufacturers regarding ingredients, leach rates, and other relevant data.

ACA and its Marine Coatings Council will continue to work with Washington DOE on antifouling marine coating matters.

Contact ACA’s Rhett Cash for more information.

The post Washington Governor Signs Delay of Copper Ban appeared first on American Coatings Association.



from American Coatings Association https://www.paint.org/washington-copper-signed/
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Huntsman to Acquire CVC Thermoset Specialties

Huntsman Corporation has announced its agreement to acquire CVC Thermoset Specialties, a North American specialty chemical manufacturer serving the industrial composites, adhesives and coatings markets. CVC Thermoset Specialties is part of Emerald Performance Materials LLC, which is majority owned by affiliates of American Securities LLC.

CVC Thermoset Specialties has annual revenues of approximately $115 million with two manufacturing facilities located in Akron, Ohio, and Maple Shade, N.J. Under terms of the agreement, Huntsman will pay $300 million, subject to customary closing adjustments, in an all-cash transaction funded from available liquidity. The transaction is expected to close around midyear of 2020.

“The acquisition of CVC Thermoset Specialties brings valuable complementary technology breadth to our Advanced Materials portfolio and its unique products will make systems using our class-leading epoxy-based materials even tougher, stronger, and more durable. In addition to strengthening our position in North America, Huntsman will use our existing asset footprint and routes to market in Europe and Asia to rapidly grow and globalize CVC Thermoset Specialties’ exciting and complementary product range,” said Scott Wright, president of Huntsman’s Advanced Materials division.

Huntsman added that its business currently achieves EBITDA margins in excess of 25 percent, and expects to achieve significant synergies within two years.

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from American Coatings Association https://www.paint.org/huntsman-to-acquire-cvc-thermoset-specialties/
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